CoFlourishing

Cosmic Collecting 24 Nov 2018

posting by Jana

Schwartz, S.H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: theoretical advances and empirical tests in 20 countries. In M.P. Zanna, ed. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 25. Orlando: Academic Press, pp. 1–65; Rokeach, M. (1973). The Nature of Human Values. New York: The Free Press.

Schwartz, S.H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: theoretical advances and empirical tests in 20 countries. In M.P. Zanna, ed. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 25. Orlando: Academic Press, pp. 1–65; Rokeach, M. (1973). The Nature of Human Values. New York: The Free Press.

This week I participated in a Common Cause introductory workshop and masterclass session in Common Cause Communications over two days here in Adelaide. The scholarship to participate was such a gift: I learned so much about values and frames, and met some amazing people working on incredibly meaningful co-flourishing causes related to the environment, democracy, and asylum seeking. My thanks to the facilitator and co-founder of Common Cause Australia, Dr Eleanor Glenn for this opportunity and for creating such a collegial learning environment.


WHAT IS COMMON CAUSE?

 
Initially a social change report published by several UK NGOs, Common Cause is a large and growing civil society network working to rebalance cultural values for a more sustainable society. Values are a driving force behind many of our attitudes and behaviours, and a ubiquitous presence in advertising, media, politics, and third sector campaigns. Working at the level of values helps us address the structural causes of ecological, economic and social injustice.
— https://valuesandframes.org/
 

WHAT DID I LEARN ABOUT VALUES & FRAMES?

I learned that a large number of values, or principles/motivations that guide (most subconsciously) our goals, attitudes, and behaviours, have been found to be universal and can be grouped into two categories: intrinsic and extrinsic.

The 58 values distilled from extensive research are mapped in the image above.

https://www.pexels.com/@joey-kyber-31917

https://www.pexels.com/@joey-kyber-31917

Intrinsic values are inherently rewarding to pursue.
Extrinsic values are based on external validation or reward.
— https://valuesandframes.org/

Researchers have further grouped these values into 10 motivational goals or values segments. These are the coloured labels in the segments on the map above.

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These segments clump together into 4 broader sets.

Intrinsic value segments include self-direction, universalism, and benevolence.

Extrinsic value segments are achievement and power. Security operates differently, and stimulation and conformity/tradition have elements that relate to both intrinsic and extrinsic values.

The workshops, and the work of Common Cause generally, centres around helping organisations activate intrinsic values when engaging with people about their work. Research referred to in Common Cause materials indicates that intrinsic values are associated with greater pro-social and environmental attitudes and behaviours and that extrinsic values are associated with reduced pro-social and environmental attitudes and behaviours.

Just like a muscle, our individual values are strengthened each time they are activated.
— https://valuesandframes.org/

Frames are sets of associations that help order ideas. I found that the concept of frames is easiest to understand by example. One example Eleanor shared in the workshop was to invite us to think about taxes from two different frames: tax as a contribution and tax as a burden. Frames are a choice, and organisations can choose frames for communication that activate intrinsic values and help people reason about an issue from the organisation’s perspective.

To learn more, download resource guides at https://valuesandframes.org/downloads

To learn more, download resource guides at https://valuesandframes.org/downloads

For me, the Community of the Cosmic Person and the idea of Ecozoic Living activate the Openness to Change and Self-Transcendence segments of the values map:

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What activities and associations help nurture your intrinsic values?

On Connectedness & Reconnecting

posting by Jana

forest bathing certificate.jpg

It's been a long time between drinks, as the saying goes. My last blog post was 31 March - wow. 

What's been keeping me away from the Flourishing Point? Ecozoic Living, of course. 

I have structured my commitment to Ecozoic Living - learning to be present to the planet in a mutually beneficial manner - around three areas of focus: critical thinking, daily practice, and connecting with others through the Community of the Cosmic Person. Sometimes I can strike a balance of time and energy amongst the three, but at other times one or two areas just sort of take over.

In the past few months, I have been focused on meeting certain deadlines related to my PhD and to completing the training to become a certified nature and forest guide. I have also moved house - selling one and buying another - and paid a visit to family half-way around the world. It's been a busy time. 

The PhD is back to plodding along, the houses have settled (fingers crossed...as of Monday), the family trip is a fond memory, and the guide training is complete. Finally, some space in my brain and my days has opened up for reconnecting with community. 

So let's talk! 

Connectedness, in fact, is a common thread between the critical theory and the daily practice work that's been taking up so much of my time recently. For the PhD, I've been reading new materialism, particularly the work of quantum physicist and philosopher Karen Barad. In her book, Meeting the Universe Halfway: quantum physics and the entanglement of matter and meaning, Barad proposes that beyond everything being connected to everything else, everything brings everything 'else' into existence. There are no pre-existing entities that interact, but rather intra-action itself is the primary reality. The implication is that matter and meaning are co-emergent. Colloquially speaking, we really are 'making it up as we go along', with the 'we' being existence itself including human beings along with everything else. It's the 'along with' that counts, inviting a sense of participation or, as I like to call it, CoFlourishing. 

In terms of daily practice, the forest therapy guide training I've just completed emphasises reciprocity and relationship. Forest therapy is not a matter of going into the woods to get something out of it but rather spending time in nature connecting to self and others, including the non-human others with whom our existence is intricately interwoven. The primary practice is one of presence, invited through a simple question: what are you noticing? A daily practice of living this question sets the stage for participating in the CoFlourishing of people, place, and planet ... together. 

I invite you to 'like' the Facebook page for a nature connection collective that colleagues and I from the forest therapy training group have formed. We share resources and research about the practices of nature connection and post announcements about local forest therapy events. Meanwhile, I also invite you to live the question, 'What are you noticing?' 

Immersed ... and Emerging

after six weeks of picking up new skills and resources for CoFlourishing - we're back!
posted by Jana

CCP is a partner in delivering a program called Located! Being Onkaparingan - helping people connect to people & planet in their particular place (a  beautiful and naturally diverse region  south of Adelaide, South Australia)

CCP is a partner in delivering a program called Located! Being Onkaparingan - helping people connect to people & planet in their particular place (a beautiful and naturally diverse region south of Adelaide, South Australia)

I've just completed a 6-month practicum in nature and forest therapy guiding. What a journey! The practice is 5-star Ecozoic: it's all about learning to be present to the planet in a mutually beneficial manner. 

In a series of invitations, participants on a forest therapy/nature connection walk slow down, pay fresh attention with all of their senses, and engage in mindfulness practices that put the focus on reciprocity with nature. 

It's also an amazing practice for CoFlourishing of people, place, and planet ... together. In addition to invitations to experience connecting with nature, participants are invited to connect with one another. After most invitations, the group regathers in a circle to hear from each other, prompted by the simple and open-hearted question, 'What are you noticing?' To listen and be listened to, without judgement and with attention to one's authentic experience, is a not only a gift but also a conscious act of cultural repair. 

The CCP, through my involvement as a Certified Forest and Nature Therapy Guide, is participating in a number of local projects aligned with Ecozoic Living and CoFlourishing. Read more here (and subscribe to the quarterly newsletter if you'd like!) 

Meanwhile, my intention is to be more regular with blog posts now that the extra flurry of busy-ness is past (for the moment). Thanks for your patience while I was immersed in these off-line connections.